Proofreading Course: Good Grammar

 

Our proofreading course will equip you with the editorial skills you need to become a qualified proofreader and copy editor. This online course will show you how to correct printed documents and webpages, and make them readable and legally compliant.

Remember, the style guide is always right, so this is why you, as a proofreader, should check the style guide first, before using the dictionary or the grammar book.

However, grammar is not generally covered in the style guide. English grammar rules are much the same in any good grammar book, but please use the Blue Book of Grammar’s rules for this course.

If you need help with learning English grammar, try using free resources available online.

Using software to help

Some copy editors use software to help them edit text. Your copy of MS word or OpenOffice should be able to catch quite a few spelling and grammar errors, though do not rely on this.

Additional software that will pick up spelling, punctuation and grammar mistakes is also available. Some popular ones are:

http://grammarly.com/

http://www.whitesmoke.com/

There are also programmes that read text back to you. Some editors find it useful to hear the text to establish if it makes sense and flows well.

Your computer may also have a screen reader.

It is not our place to recommend these or any other packages. Some people swear by them and others avoid them. It is a matter of experimentation and choice.

However, our advice is: even if you do use editing or checking software, you still need to read copy through thoroughly to make sure nothing has been missed, or has been changed when it should not have been.

Software can provide useful backup but should never be considered the only editing method. This is because some words may slip past the software net and could cause a proofreader or copy editor some embarrassing moments if they send the text off without having checked it thoroughly first.

Needless to say, make sure you have checked all your assignments before submitting them. It’s also good practice to extend your correct use of grammar to emails and social media posts.

See our proofreading course